ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

(via hiphoplaboratory)

naked-football:

Ruud Gullit (r) helps Frank Rijkaard (l) with his collar while Netherlands national team waits for the departure to Reykjavik for the UEFA Euro 1984 qualifying match against Iceland. Schiphol airport, Amsterdam, 30 August 1982. Photo: Marcel Antonisse

naked-football:

Ruud Gullit (r) helps Frank Rijkaard (l) with his collar while Netherlands national team waits for the departure to Reykjavik for the UEFA Euro 1984 qualifying match against Iceland. Schiphol airport, Amsterdam, 30 August 1982. Photo: Marcel Antonisse

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At the same time, Laporta’s group were learning the extent of the mess they had walked into. The new board inherited a debt of €150m and discovered that the previous regime had, in its final year, spent €196m, but only earned €120m. Soriano was stunned at what he found. “The most striking thing was that the management style was based on what you might have done in 1970,” he says. “Our simple concept was that if we were to manage this club, which is so relevant for so many people, we had to have somebody in the marketing department who knew about marketing. Not just somebody who had been there for years from the ‘football family’ and had ended up in that job. Get someone from Proctor and Gamble who knows about marketing. That person can then learn about football. It was the same with finance people, and so on.”

However, there was far more to achieve than had initially been anticipated and, on the pitch, results went from average to appalling. A crisis was looming. At this time, Soriano recalls receiving support from an unexpected source. “I remember how instrumental Luis Enrique was to the changes,” he told me. “He was the captain and sort of looked at us with big question marks. “After a while he relaxed because he saw Ronaldinho and Rafa Márquez and players like that arriving. His view was ‘We have been here so many years and the club has been buying players who did not have the quality year after year’. That’s exactly what he said to us. “It is a fact that expensive players who didn’t have the quality were regulars. Geovanni Deiberson and Fabio Rochemback are two good examples. Luis Enrique waited, saw the players we signed and then came back to us to say, ‘Okay, this is much better. These players are at the top level.’ “Another factor was important. At the beginning of the first season, Frank put Luis in the team every game. We would say, ‘Why are you doing this?’ Luis Enrique was getting close to his retirement and technically he probably wasn’t the right guy. “Frank said, ‘I have to give the first opportunity to the old guys, to the owners of the dressing room, so that they are treated fairly. Then, if I have to change them and give space to the new guys, they have been given that opportunity.’ “Eventually, Luis started playing less, but because of how he’d been treated he was instrumental in creating unity. There was a sense that he would help pass things on to the new group and only then he would go. This one decision by Frank Rijkaard was extremely important.

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Graham Hunter (via messionel)